Browsing Category

Pescetarian

East Series, Food, Pescetarian, Soups + Stews

Easy 15-Minute Miso Soup

The belly-warming broth, the nourishing wakame, the silky soft bits of tofu… miso soup is something I’ve never been able to pass up when dining in a Japanese restaurant. (Especially after eating my weight in sushi.) For dessert, I would resist the green tea ice cream and happily sip at a some soothing miso soup instead.

Of course, in true Dana fashion, my adoration for this soup eventually developed some serious curiosity. After my meal, I’d whirl my spoon around in the mesmerizing cloudy broth to disrupt the suspended miso and wonder if this good stuff was something I could easily whip up in my own kitchen.

Fabulous news, friends: it is *so* easy.

(No really, it’s pretty effortless.)

With a few easy-to-acquire ingredients and 15 measly minutes, you can be delving into your very own bowl of restaurant-quality miso soup in the comfort of your own home.

You don’t even have to put pants on for this.

Continue Reading

Food, Main Dishes, Pescetarian

Fiery One-Pot Seafood Pasta With Arrabbiata Sauce

THIS RECIPE IS SPONSORED BY DELALLO | OPINIONS ARE MY OWN

Pulling together a nourishing meal after a long day at work can be taxing, but that post-dinner clean up is the REAL thief of joy. I don’t know about you, but I can’t curl up on the couch with a cozy bowl of pasta and fall into a state of relief with a sink full of dishes; the thought of that crowded sink hovers over my head like a big dark cloud.

This is why one-pot pastas are a thing of beauty — a true knight in saucy armor.

Not only is this recipe a cinch, but it ups your dinner game with the inclusion of tender shrimp, sweet scallops, and juicy mussels which makes it ideal for a weeknight quick-fix or a next-level dinner party.

Oh, and the sauce? It packs one heck of a punch.

Continue Reading

East Series, Food, Pescetarian, Sides, tapa-tizers + snacks

Agedashi Tofu

Whenever I dine at a Japanese restaurant, exploring the appetizers is one of my favorite parts. It’s impossible to pass up on Japanese-style gyoza and lightly salted edamame. Of course, every once in a while, we order something we’ve never had before and are completely blown away — like agedashi tofu.

If you dig tofu and you frequent Japanese restaurants, you’ve probably had your fill of this crispy and pillowy goodness. If not, your proverbial socks are about to be blown off.

Continue Reading

Food, Main Dishes, Pescetarian

Mediterranean Cod en Papillote {Cod Steamed in Parchment}

The past week and a half has been a ride.

Eleven days ago, I went through a server migration for this blog. I wish I could say the transition was smooth, but it wasn’t. It was nightmarish. The blog itself remained live, which is the most important thing, but behind the scenes was all kinds of chaos and anxiety with a splash of defeat. I also had to redesign the site twice and, when I finally thought I was in the clear, I faced some major issues with photos losing quality once uploaded into the new theme. WHY ME. I mean, since this is a food blog, quality photos are kind of a big deal. It was one bump after another.

As if all of that computer-y techy stuff wasn’t bad enough, eleven days ago was also when I kickstarted my Elimination Diet in an attempt to try and sort out a possible food sensitivity. I haven’t been eating nuts, grains (rice, quinoa, etc.), legumes or beans, nightshades (tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers of any sort), citrus, dairy, eggs, soy, wheat or gluten and, much to my chagrin, no coffee. *collar tug* So basically, throughout all of that stress, I couldn’t even turn to pizza or beer to ease the pain.

Fact: carrot sticks don’t ease the pain.

I did however manage to survive, and I’m happy to report that I feel better than ever. Also, in a fit of desperation one evening while feeling deprived of ingredients, I created this Mediterranean-inspired cod steamed in parchment.

I’ve had it three times in the last 11 days. If you like fish, you need this; if you don’t, this might be a turning point.

Continue Reading

East Series, Food, Main Dishes, Pescetarian, Soups + Stews

Ochazuke

THIS RECIPE IS SPONSORED BY ARBOR TEAS | OPINIONS ARE MY OWN

Much like the Okonomiyaki I made back in December, I’d never tried Ochazuke until I whipped it up for this series. If this series has taught me anything, it’s that if you find yourself intrigued by a dish you’ve never had before, you can still attempt it at home and totally nail it. So okay, you lack the satisfaction of a proper comparison, but when you dig in and take that first bite you will definitely know whether you’ve done the dish justice or not. Just follow a solid recipe from a trustworthy source! *ahem*…

Ochazuke (ocha meaning tea and zuke meaning submerged) is like nothing I’ve ever had before, and I mean that in the best way. It’s a fuss-free lazy day fave amongst the Japanese (and now me) that is typically served in an overly large bowl, because let’s face it: the bigger with some foods, the better. This is why bowl meals are trending, folks. But a large mug, cereal bowl or soup bowl will work just fine. The idea is to be able to curl up and get comfy with this bad boy, so if you have a vessel that allows you to do that, all is right in the world of Ochazuke.

Common toppings include savory ingredients like salted salmon, shredded nori, wasabi, pickled vegetables, mitsuba, toasted sesame seeds and broken Japanese rice crackers for a salty crunch; it’s all about preference.

Two major things drew my attention to this recipe while researching dishes:

  1. Comfort food. Everything I’d read about this dish suggested that it was total comfort food and, seeing that it’s February and winter is still daunting us, that’s what we’re after. Best of all, it’s a cinch to make — so if you’ve had a long day or simply want to bask in some weekend laziness, Ochazuke is where it’s at.
  2. Tea as a broth. I would have never thought to use straight up green tea, or any tea, as a broth for a savory dish — but here we are. Part of me feared the green tea would drown the dish in a sea of muted flavors, but as long as you use a quality tea like Arbor Tea’s Organic Genmaicha (pronounced GEN-my-cha), you’ll end up with an earthy flavor that is cozy and soul-soothing.

There *is* another variation of Ochazuke that replaces green tea with dashi stock, but between the Spicy Shoyu Ramen and the Okonomiyaki in this series, we’ve seen dashi aplenty. I wanted to honor the simplicity of this dish and, even more so, give this whole green tea as a broth thing a whirl.

I’m thrilled to report that it. was. ah-mazing.

Arbor Teas

Since green tea is a prominent ingredient in this recipe, I wanted a high-quality blend that would provide a natural and earthy flavor. Nothing overly potent, but certainly not something that would leave the dish watered down. Arbor Teas selection of tea in general is impressive, and their greens are absolutely perfect for Ochazuke. Needless to say, when Arbor Teas and I decided to partner up for this post, I was elated; I get to shed light on an ingredient that is not only tasty, but sustainable and fair-trade. High five! It’s also worth mentioning that Arbor Teas’ packaging is backyard compostable. So, you know, if you respect the earth you walk on, double high five.

When it comes to selecting a type of green tea, Ochazuke gives the warmest welcome to Houjicha, Genmaicha and Sencha. After spending a rainy afternoon blissfully sipping these teas to test them out (blog life is haaaaaard), I decided that Genmaicha was the one.

Ochazuke | Killing ThymeSome may think that green tea is green tea no matter how you blend it or brew it — but any tea snob who has consumed enough quality teas (Quali-teas? #Qualiteas — can we get that trending?) will tell you otherwise. Even I myself, a devoted coffee drinker, could notice subtle differences between the three blends. That, my friends, is good tea.

So, why Genmaicha? Arbor Teas’ blend is made up of organic green tea and organic toasted brown rice giving it a toasty flavor that is light-bodied and carries minimal bitterness; broth-y perfection, y’all!

And will you just look at those swoon-worthy tea leaves and toasted rice pellets?

Ochazuke | Killing Thyme

Though the concept of this dish may seem far-off from the bowl of feelgood soup that you’re used to, the similarities are undeniable. The heartiness from the rice and salmon are reminiscent of your standard chicken and rice soup; the hot tea, which you can add a tablespoon of soy sauce to for extra flavor, is as belly-warming as any other soup broth out there. And, if you dig salty crackers in your soup, we’ve got that covered with Japanese rice crackers.

This dish is a total win, and though you won’t find it on many restaurant menus outside of Japan, you can easily find the ingredients at your local Asian market to make it in the comfort of your own kitchen.

(And you totally should.)

To see more of what Arbor Teas has to offer, you can check out their Website. Don’t forget to like them on Facebook and Instagram as well!

THIS RECIPE IS PART OF MY EAST SERIES. 

In this series, I’ll be covering dishes from Japan, China and Korea to cover East Asia, followed by dishes from Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia to cover Southeast Asia.

Making this recipe? Snap a pic and tag me on Instagram: @Killing__Thyme /#killingthyme. For more delish eats, follow me on INSTAGRAM + PINTEREST.
Print

Ochazuke

Ochazuke is a comforting Japanese dish that includes rice, a hot broth of green tea and various savory toppings.
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 1
Author Killing Thyme

Ingredients

  • 1 3 oz fillet of sustainable salmon salted
  • 1 cup cooked rice
  • 1-2 TBSP broken/roughly chopped Japanese rice crackers
  • 1 tsp shredded or thinly sliced nori dried/roasted seaweed
  • 1 tsp furikake Japanese rice seasoning
  • 2 TBSP strands of mitsuba trefoil, chopped; or 1 thinly sliced scallion
  • Wasabi optional, for taste
  • 1 cup of Arbor Teas Genmaicha Sencha or Hojicha green tea, prepared as per instructions on package
  • 1 TBSP Kikkoman soy sauce optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. In the meantime, prepare/cook the rice.
  3. Salt the salmon fillet and bake for 15 minutes.
  4. Prepare the tea and set aside.
  5. Once the salmon is done, flake it with a fork to break it down into bite-sized pieces.
  6. Place the rice in a large bowl and top with the salmon and your selection of savory ingredients.
  7. Add soy sauce to broth if desired.
FOR MORE DELISH EATS, FIND ME ON INSTAGRAM AND PINTEREST.
HAVE YOU MADE THIS RECIPE? SNAP A PIC AND TAG ME ON INSTA! @KILLING__THYME /#KILLINGTHYME