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What’s In Season? May Produce Guide.

This time of year is so strange in today’s climate. We thought we were safe to start planting our garden mid-late April. But here we are, into May, and there’s a frost warning for tonight. I really hope we all make it out of this okay…

May is a pretty exciting time for produce. The anticipated rhubarb makes an appearance, mangos start to show up, and we still get to enjoy an abundance of our favorite green veggies.

Here’s what to look for this month.

Asparagus


Seasoned asparagus in a glass bowl.

Much like broccoli, all asparagus needs in order to be delicious is a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and a quick roast in the oven. (Or sizzle on the grill.) It makes for a perfect side to just about any main, but it’s also great when tossed into pasta. With plenty of nutrition and few calories, asparagus should be seen on your plate a lot this spring.

Try my Creamy One-Pot Pasta with Smoked Salmon and Asparagus!

Or try asparagus in these other recipes:

  1. Easy Asparagus Fillo Tart by Rainbow Nourishments
  2. Cheesy Baked Asparagus by Don’t Go Bacon My Heart
  3. Burrata Pizza with Shaved Asparagus Arugula Salad by Spices In My DNA

Avocado


Avocados that have been sliced open.

Avocados. We’re obsessed. We want it with chips, smashed onto toast, tossed into salads, and stacked onto sandwiches. Avocado is the perfect addition for those who love everything that is rich and creamy, but want to make smarter choices. This fruit is high in fiber, heart-healthy fats, and it offers up a ton of vitamins. It also contains more potassium than bananas!

Try avocado in my Grilled Tuna Steak Salad with Wasabi Vinaigrette!

Or try these other recipes:

  1. Citrus Avocado Salad by Fork in the Kitchen
  2. Spiced Flank Steak Tacos by The Original Dish
  3. Mexican-Style English Muffin Pizzas by Kitchen @ Hoskins

Beets


Bunch of beets.

A lot of people dislike beets because of their earthy taste; because they “taste like dirt”. But roasting them brings out a richness and sweetness that works really well in a hearty salad or as a side dish! It also has great health benefits. This nutritious root veg can help keep blood pressure in check, act as an anti-inflammatory, and improve digestive health. You can also blend it up and use it as food coloring, thanks to its natural bright fuchsia tone.

Try beets in my Fall Harvest Wild Rice Medley!

Or try them in these other recipes:

    1. Beet and Dill Lentils by The Nourished Mind 
    2. Roasted Beet Salad by Waves In the Kitchen
    3. Vegan Beetroot Risotto by Lazy Cat Kitchen

Broccoli


Two bunches of broccoli.

It’s funny how as a kid, broccoli was only tolerable if it was smothered in melted cheese. Today, roasted broccoli is hands down my favorite veg side. A simple drizzle of olive oil and a few dashes of kosher salt and cracked black pepper go a long way. However, my favorite way to eat it is with garlic salt and nutritional yeast so you get that cheesiness without the extra calories. When shopping, be sure to snag broccoli with tightly-packed green florets and firm stalks.

Try my Oven-Roasted Broccoli with Nutritional Yeast!

Or try broccoli in these other recipes:

      1. Broccoli Beef Soba Bowl by The Modern Proper
      2. Three Cheese Broccoli Soup by The Almond Eater
      3. Creamy Lemon Pappardelle with Roasted Broccoli by Hello Veggie

Cauliflower


Cauliflower

Cauliflower has been viewed as a trendy health food for a while now. It’s being shredded to substitute rice and mashed to mimic potatoes; it’s even being used as pizza crust! In addition to helping folks who are trying to lessen their carb intake, the cauliflower has a bangin’ nutritional profile.

Try cauliflower in my Easy One-Pot Roasted Cauliflower Soup!

Or try it in these other recipes:

      1. Air Fryer Blackened Cauliflower Tacos by Sprinkles & Sea Salt
      2. Roasted Garlic Mashed Cauliflower by Every Little Crumb
      3. Maple Sriracha Cauliflower Wings by Cupful of Kale

Greens


Head of green and purple artisan lettuce.

Spring greens are about to sprout and our salads are about to get a whole lot brighter! Spinach, lettuce, arugula, and swiss chard are fantastic on their own or blended together. Don’t forget that these nutrient-dense greens aren’t meant for salads exclusively. You can twirl them into your pasta, toss them into soups, and blend them into your smoothies.

Try my Lemon Pasta with Arugula!

Or try these other recipes:

      1. Spinach Pasta Salad with Feta and Tomato by Peas and Crayons
      2. Giant Beans and Greens on Toast by With Spice
      3. Thai Lettuce Wraps by Cupful of Kale 

Herbs


Herbs

It is too easy to go overboard with fresh herbs this time of year. Especially if you’re growing your own. You can throw them into your pasta sauce, use them to garnish grilled meats, toss them with roasted potatoes—you name it. Fresh herbs give everything an extra dose of freshness, not to mention a beautiful punch of green.

Try them in my One Pan Herb and Garlic Chicken with Rice!

Or try them in one of these other recipes:

  1. DIY Garden Herb Salt by A Life Delicious
  2. Green Shakshuka by The Crooked Carrot
  3. Falafel Flatbread by Downshiftology

Kale


Bowl of torn kale.

Remember when kale was the star of the superfoods? Kale chips, kale smoothies—kale was everywhere. Various other vegetables have stepped into the superfood spotlight since, but kale still holds a secure spot in the nutritional world with its rich source of vitamins, folate, manganese, and dietary minerals.

Try my Soothing Chicken and Kale Soup!

Or try kale in these other recipes:

  1. Chickpea Kale Caesar Wrap by Cait’s Plate
  2. Loaded Veggie Tacos with Avocado Cilantro Sauce by A Simple Palate
  3. Squash and Caramelized Onion Pasta by Lazy Cat Kitchen

Leeks


A large leek.

Leeks are very easy to cook with, which makes sense since they’re related to other favorites in cooking like onions, garlic, shallots, and chives. You can blend them into soups, add them to stuffing during the holidays, roast them, or crisp them up and use them as a garnish.

Try leeks in my Vegetarian Slow Cooker Stuffing!

Or try them in these other recipes:

      1. Potato Bacon Frittata with Pickled Asparagus by The Original Dish
      2. Crispy Egg-In-a-Hole with Sauteed Leeks and Thyme by Vibrant by the Spoonful
      3. Green Shakshuka by Olive and Mango

Mango


A couple of mangoes on a marble slab.

This tropical fruit is always welcome at the table—weather it be bundled into a summer roll, tossed into a fruit salsa, or swirled into ice cream. It also happens to have a ton of health benefits! It promotes good gut health, boosts immunity, can help lower cholesterol, and it has a low glycemic index. It’s easy to enjoy a sweet and peppery mango on its own, but I encourage you to start throwing them into recipes.

Try mango in my Shrimp Tacos with Mango Habanero Salsa!

Or try it in these other recipes:

  1. Vegan Yogurt Fruit Popsicles by Heart Fully Nourished
  2. Grilled Chicken Teriyaki Kabobs by Erhardts Eat
  3. Raspberry Mango Pop Tarts by Cherry On My Sundae

Mushrooms


Bowl full of cremini and button mushrooms.

Fun fact: there are 20 species of mushrooms that are commercially cultivated. I think my use of them extends to about four: button, baby bella/cremini, shiitake, and oyster. Mushrooms, though a strange thing to consume if you think about it, are extremely versatile in the kitchen. They can be eaten raw, tossed into stir-frys, and scattered over pizza; they can even be used as meat substitutes in some recipes.

Try my Beer Butter Mushrooms as a side to your next dinner!

Or try mushrooms in these other recipes:

      1. Healthy Triple Mushroom Ramen by Well Is More
      2. Creamy Chicken and Mushrooms by Bowl of Delicious
      3. Parmesan Spinach Mushroom Pasta Skillet by Eatwell101

Peas


Bowl full of bright green peas with a pat of melting butter on top.

The small yet mighty pea is much more flexible than it gets credit for. Sure, peas are great smothered in melted butter. But they also make a fantastic addition to spring-inspired crostini, pot pies, pastas, and casseroles. Be sure to add them where you can—despite their size, they pack a fair amount of fiber and antioxidants.

Try my Spring Snap Pea and Radish Canapés!

Or try peas in these other recipes:

      1. Blistered Snap Peas with Burrata and Breadcrumbs by The Original Dish
      2. 20-Minute Bow Tie Pasta by Eight Forest Lane
      3. Instant Pot Split Pea Soup by Munchkin Time

Radishes


Bunch of radishes.

Thrown over tacos, tossed into a green salad, or pickled and served with charcuterie, radishes are one of my faves. There’s just something exhilarating about them with their snappy peppery flavor. Despite the fact that they’re mostly used as a garnish or addition, they’re also great on their own when roasted and they come with some pretty awesome health benefits—like supporting a healthy digestive system.

Try my Addictive Spicy Quick Pickle Radishes!

Or try radishes in these other recipes:

      1. Roasted Radish Mini Bagels by My Goodness Kitchen
      2. Roasted Radishes by Real + Vibrant
      3. Radish Potato Salad by With Food + Love

Rhubarb


rhubarb

Rhubarb isn’t in season for long, so people jump on it when they see it. And for good reason! This sour and crunchy treat lends itself to so many recipes, both sweet to savory. You can add it to jams, bake it into pies, and muddle it into cocktails.

Try my French Toast with Strawberry Rhubarb Compote!

Or try rhubarb in these other recipes:

  1. Rhubarb Cake by Katiebird Bakes
  2. Raspberry Rhubarb Rosé Spritz by JustineCelina.com
  3. Crispy Tofu with Rhubarb Hot and Sour Sauce by Blue Moon Kitchen

2 Comments

  • Becca
    May 11, 2020 at 5:49 pm

    Love these posts! Thank you so much for including my Citrus Avocado Salad in this round-up!

    Reply
  • JustineCelina
    May 9, 2020 at 1:06 pm

    Dana, thank you so much much for including my Raspberry Rhubarb Rose Spritz in this beautiful produce guide! I’ll be plastering it all over the internet, commencing now. Hope you and your family are safe and well!

    Reply

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